Banks Peninsula Track – Part Two, Stony Bay to Akaroa

This is the second half of the walking track that explores the remote outer bays of Banks Peninsula, starting and finishing in Akaroa.  The 35km Banks Peninsula Track passes through private farmland and follows spectacular volcanic coastline for part of the way.  It also crosses the crater rim twice.  There is a diversity of scenery, with native bush, waterfalls and  beaches.  The track can be completed in two days or four days, with accommodation provided in converted farmhouses at four points.  We completed this walk in early January 2015, in temperatures of up to 30C.

Banks Peninsula Track route map

Banks Peninsula Track route map

Two-day walkers spend the first night at Ohuku (#1 on map) and the second night at Stony Bay (#12).   Four day walkers spend one night each at Flea Bay and Otanerito Bay as well. The second day’s walk is 16km, from Stoney Bay to Akaroa.  Click on map to enlarge.

 

Stony Bay accommodation. with shower room on the left

Stony Bay accommodation. with shower room on the left

 

Woodfired water heating for outdoor bath

Woodfired water heating for outdoor bath

 

Hut facilities for two-day walkers, candles because there is no electricity

Hut facilities for two-day walkers, candles because there is no electricity

 

Keruru, NZ native pigeon

Keruru, NZ native pigeon

 

New Zealand Fur Seal in Stony Bay

New Zealand Fur Seal in Stony Bay in the evening

 

New Zealand Fur Seal pup

New Zealand Fur Seal pup

 

Fur Seal enjoying the early morning sun

Fur Seal enjoying the early morning sun

 

Pompeys Pillar at the entrance to Otanerito Bay, in the hot  early morning sun

Pompeys Pillar at the entrance to Otanerito Bay, in the hot early morning sun

 

Sea Arch

Sleepy Bay sea stack

Prior to September 2010, this sea stack formed an arch through to the mainland.  On 4th September 2010 the lower part of the arch collapsed during a large earthquake.  A few days later the arch collapsed totally.  Wave action has subsequently removed all of the debris.

 

Entering Otanerito Bay

Entering Otanerito Bay, looking back to Pompey’s Pillar

 

Otanerito Bay

Otanerito Bay

 

Converted farmhouse accommodation at Otanerito Bay

Converted farmhouse accommodation at Otanerito Bay

 

Otanerito Bay verandah, our last rest stop before the steep  climb through Hinewai Reserve

Otanerito Bay verandah, our last rest stop before the steep climb through Hinewai Reserve

 

600 year old Kah

600 year old, 31m high native Kahikatea tree in the Hinewai Reserve

 

Welcome cup of fresh spring water

Welcome mug of fresh spring water during the climb up through the Hinewai Reserve

 

Red Beech forest in Hineawi

Red Beech trees (nothafagus fisca) in Hinewai Reserve

 

Final descent into Akaroa (photo taken by my daughter)

Final descent into Akaroa (photo taken by my daughter)

Click here to see the first half of the Banks Peninsula Track.

For those interested in the conservation work on the Hinewai Reserve, click on the link below to a post on my husband’s website.

https://keithwoodford.wordpress.com/2009/12/27/hinewai/

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