Arthur’s Pass Walkway and beyond

The main highway between Christchurch and the South Island’s West Coast crosses the Southern Alps at  Arthur’s Pass (920m).  In March 2014, the Arthur’s Pass Walkway was opened. It connects Arthur’s Pass village with the summit of the pass, covering 7km (one way) and takes about 1.5 hours to walk (three hours return on the same track).  It offers a sub-alpine experience with forest, tussocks, waterfalls, wetlands and views of surrounding mountains.  Walkers can choose to link to other short walks, including the Devil’s Punchbowl, and the Bridal Veil Falls, or the longer Bealey Valley, Temple Basin and Otira Valley tracks.

The photos were all taken in mid December 2014.

asdsadsa River near the Punchbowl carpark

Bealey River from the bridge, at the start of the walk, near the Punchbowl carpark

 

Arthur's Pass Walkway map

Arthur’s Pass Walkway map, click on map to enlarge

 

Arthur Dobson's story, information board on entry to the bush

Arthur Dobson’s story, after whom Arthur’s Pass was named

 

Well constructed track through mainly beech forest

Well constructed track through predominantly beech forest

 

Many pretty waterfalls along the way

A waterfall along the way

 

Arthur's Pass village from a view point on the track

Looking back to Arthur’s Pass village from the track

 

Looking into McGrath Creek, with the ridge linking Avalanche Peak to Mt Rolleston behind

Looking west into McGrath Creek, and  the ridge that links Avalanche Peak to Mt Rolleston

 

Jack's Hut

Jack’s Hut

At the halfway point of the walkway is Jack’s Hut, where the track crosses the highway.  Restored and opened in 2004, it was originally built in 1879 as a roadman’s hut.  Roadmen lived in these cottages with their families, near the section of roadway they were responsible for.

Picturesque  beech forest above Jack's Hut

Beech trees and forest moss above Jack’s Hut

 

The low peak of Mt Rolleston from the track

The Low Peak of Mt Rolleston from the track

 

Turpentine srub (Dracophyllum longifolium) amonst the vegetation at the end of the track

Red-tinged turpentine scrub (Dracophyllum longifolium) with beech forest behind

 

Mt Cook lily (Ranunculus lyallii)

Mt Cook lily (Ranunculus lyallii)

The Dobson Nature Walk continues from the end of the Arthur’s Pass Walkway.  It crosses boardwalks through subalpine tussocks, alpine flowers and shrubs.  The Mt Cook lily has a misleading name – it is actually the world’s largest buttercup. There are many of these lilies to be seen in summer, along the nature walk.

 

Mt Cook lilies in tussocks on the Lake Misery Track, which leads to the Otira Valley track

Mt Cook lilies in tussocks on the Lake Misery Track

Walkers can continue  to the Otira Valley Track via the Lake Misery Track.

 

Track to Temple Basin Skifield, across the highway from the Arthur's Pass Track

Track to Temple Basin Skifield, across the highway from the Dobson Nature Walk

 

Arthur Dobson Memorial beside the highway, at the highest point on the road before it drops away to the West Coast

Arthur Dobson Memorial beside the highway, before it drops away to the West Coast

 

Lupins near Klondyke Corner, with peaks of the Upper Waimakariri

Lupins near Klondyke Corner, with peaks of the Upper Waimakariri

Part of the Arthur’s Pass experience can be seeing the lupins at Klondyke Corner, about 7km south of Arthur’s Pass village.  They flower mainly in December.

 

Lupins at Klondyke Corner, looking up the Bealey Valley

Lupins at Klondyke Corner, looking up the Bealey Valley

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One thought on “Arthur’s Pass Walkway and beyond

  1. Pingback: Arthur's Pass Walking Track | New Zealand | Hikespeak.com

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