The Bridle Path, Christchurch

In 1850 early European settlers arrived at the Port of Lyttelton.  It was clear that the main settlement would be on the plains on the northern side of the Port Hills, in what is now Christchurch.  And so the Bridle Path was constructed, a steep pathway across the Port Hills over which horses were led, carrying all essential supplies. It was the only means of traversing the hills until the Summit Road over Evans Pass was completed in 1857, and the rail tunnel was built in 1867.  The Path rises to 350 metres from the Port of Lyttelton, and descends steeply into the Heathcote Valley. Click once on any image to enlarge.

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Ascending from the Heathcote Valley,the Bridle Path is now a popular walking and mountain biking track

The Bridle Path is now a popular walking and mountain biking track

 

Looking down the Heathcote Valley, early on a winter morning

Looking down the Heathcote Valley, the Estuary and Pegasus Bay early on a winter morning

 

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Port of Lyttelton from the highest point

Port of Lyttelton from the top of the Bridle Path

 

Descending into the Heathcote Valley again, overlooking Christchurch

Descending into the Heathcote Valley again, overlooking Christchurch and the Canterbury Plains

 

Remnants of a frosty morning in the Heathcote Valley below

Remnants of a frosty morning in the Heathcote Valley below

How the scene appeared in a drawing from 1881, from the National Library of New Zealand.

More Bridle Path information on another one of my posts here.

 

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One thought on “The Bridle Path, Christchurch

  1. Pingback: Heathcote Valley from the Bridle Path – what has happened in 135 years? | annettewoodford

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